carbon, nano, CNT, swcnt, li, edge plane, arrays,
bulk, chirality, batteries, sensors, capacitors, carbon
nanotube, swcnt, mwcnt, graphene, lithium, sodium,
electrochemical, sensor, catalyst, cvd
carbon, nano, CNT, swcnt, li, edge plane, arrays,
bulk, chirality, batteries, sensors, capacitors, carbon
nanotube, swcnt, mwcnt, graphene, lithium, sodium,
electrochemical, sensor, catalyst, cvd
  • When I looked at the material with an SEM, I didn't see any CNTs. Why? CTCC material, unlike CVD grown CNTs, lacks a hollow core
    because no metal catalysts are used in production. As a result, CTCC grown materials are typically composed of ultra small single
    walled carbon nanotubes. The structure of our materials are typically sub nanometer. This increased the active electrochemical
    area, increases surface area for intercalation, and often increases device performance. The down side is the material is difficult
    to image. We have our best luck with high resolution, modern TEMs. Don’t be discouraged initially, and remember focusing on
    one specific area for an extended period of time will “burn” the material. Use carbon grids, methanol for dispersion (ultrasonic
    action won’t harm the material), and patience when obtaining images.

  • What process is used to manufacture your materials? SCNTE uses a proprietary, high temperature solid state chemistry process that
    decomposes carbides into nanomaterials of defined and consistent composition and structure.

  • What form factors can you produce? SCNTE currently produces roughly spherical bundles (“clusters”), micron phase fibers
    (“whiskers”), planar arrays, non-aligned arrays on non-planar substrates (“foams”), and non spun yarns (“NanoSilC”)

  • What is the length limit to the NanoSilC product? NanoSilC can currently be produced in 500 meter lengths of up to 10,000 tow.


  • What makes SCNTE material superior for electronic and electrochemical applications? CTCC material has several inherent advantages:
    ultra high purity with nearly no electrochemically active impurities (SiO2 is our largest contaminate), and ultra high edge plane
    behavior (a result of the very small diameter CNTs and high incident rate of bends and kinks in the CNTs).

  • Are there any process changes needed for CTCC over CVD growth? Yes, because the CTCC process is essentially a very tightly
    controlled, high temperature decomposition of carbides, the choice of suitable substrates is limited to ceramics and refractory
    materials.

  • How scalable is the process? Very. The heart of the process is a text book fluidized bed reactor. No catalysts are used, and no post
    production purification needed prior to use.

  • Can the SCNTE CarboThermal Carbide Conversion process be licensed? Yes.

  • Will you provide/produce custom form factors? Yes. If feasible, SCNTE is committed to our partners success.

  • Is the SCNTE process patented? Yes. Patent US 8252264

  • Does SCNTE make a product suitable for use in inks? Our Cluster products are ideal for inks.

  • What is “defect rate” and why is it important for electrochemical devices such as sensors, fuel cells, and electrochemical double layer capacitors?
    Defect rate is a term that describes areas of large pi bond separation. These areas are analogous to defects in graphite structure,
    hence the term. Increased separation of the pi bonds along the side walls of CNTs, by a bend or small diameter, increase the
    chemical and electrochemical activity. This means easier, more controllable functionalization, faster electron transfer rates, and
    higher specific active electrode area. This means higher sensor sensitivity, lower internal resistance for batteries, and overall
    greater performance for our partners over graphite and alternate CNT materials.
Sustainable Carbon NanoTechnology and Engineering LLC
Engineered NanoCarbon Materials for Power Storage and Transmission                       
Contact:
info@scnte.com
Phone: 937.602.4544
7278 North US68
Wilmington, OH 45177